End of an era

A heartfelt thank you to each of you who have been mentors, 

supported my efforts and/or trusted me as your executive coach.

Because of you, mine has been a successful and joyous career.

rita delahaye concours

Last night I said farewell to my last executive coaching client. No more collaborative problem solving, messaging revision and sharing of insights. I will no longer rejoice in the triumphs and growth of technology executives, nor peel that precious onion to help them see what they really need and that they are not just solving problems or working on projects, but working with people.

Gone are those mutually shared successes as I guide an ambitious director into a VP slot, or, miraculously, a CEO position. And no longer will I remediate the pain and disruption of clients recovering from prolonged job search through my, sometimes painful, but dependably successful, guidance. No more repositioning thinking on how to address the Board or reminders that when they are negotiating, they are negotiating with people with whom they will work and that winning it all is sometimes losing, in the end.

Over the past several decades of supporting the tech community I have learned much, made more than a few friends, and always, even when it was difficult, enjoyed being what one outstanding and long time CEO client called me, his women behind the curtain.

I am proud to leave my career as an executive coach knowing I made a profound difference in companies and, more importantly, in many people’s lives. That I taught clients life lessons and that they, in turn, will teach those lessons to others is my legacy. Clients have learned to write a job description that becomes a contract for success, how to interview candidates and how to fire folks who just don’t fit.

Many former clients will begin their days and sometimes their family meals with, “Please share what you are proud of today.” And every former client will begin projects and presentations by first defining their objectives and the desired outcomes. Through their careers, they will list accomplishments and not opinions on their resumes. And many will have learned to stop talking so much!

Promotion, a raise and new opportunities if you master this one skill.

Be Promotable, Get a Higer Salary and Be in Demand

There is one single function you can perform to insure your promotability, increase your compensation and endear yourself to the Board of Directors. Skeptical? Don’t be. Continue reading

A promotion is better than a job search

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How to get a promotion

 

Are you considering a job search? Is your desire to leave your employer because you want a promotion and none is in the offering? Did you ask? Don’t leave your career to chance.

Promoting you is not a top priority for management. They like the status quo and if you are doing a good job, they want you to continue to do that job. OK, so during your review they discussed your future. But were there action items on either side? Are things happening at your intended pace? Continue reading

Get Promoted – Five steps to your next big step

Don’t leave your career to chance.

1.  ASK: Promoting you is not a top priority for your manager. They like the status quo and if you are doing a good job, they want you to continue to do that job. OK, so during your review they discussed your future. But were there action items on either side? Are things happening at your intended pace? Want to make it happen on your schedule? Continue reading

What’s wrong with 20-Somethings? Get the most from the ‘ME’ generation

Me: “What’s your goal for this new career move?”

20-Something: “I want to make as much money as I can as fast as I can.”

Me: “What are you willing to do to achieve that goal?”

20-Something: “What do you mean? I will work, get promoted and make a lot of money.”

Recent Executive Coaching clients have been challenged with how to motivate and manage the 20-Somethings, or the “Entitlement Generation” as they are sarcastically named. The Execs tried all the traditional career development techniques, created incentives and offered a lot of recognition – with no affect. Demands for more money and promotions continued and the complaints and low morale had a deleterious affect on the rest of the team, the timeline and the Exec’s confidence as a team builder. Continue reading